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B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering

B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering

The Mechanical Engineering program is designed to provide comprehensive engineering education for students interested in mechanics, thermo-fluids, manufacturing, and controls and automation. Complex mechanical systems involve structures, advanced materials, sensors, and thermo-fluid systems.  

Students  are exposed to this core engineering discipline through the study and application of the principles of engineering to a broad range of systems, ranging from nano devices to large scale power plants. Laboratories and industry-led projects allow graduates to be ready to create the next generation of ideas and products.

Accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. 

  • Graduates will meet the expectations of employers of Mechanical engineers.
  • Qualified graduates will pursue advanced study if they so desire.

Students graduating from the B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering degree program will have the following abilities:

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  3. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  4. an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  7. an ability to communicate effectively.
  8. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
  9. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Mechanical Engineers can find work in the automotive and aerospace industries, defense and security, the energy sector, at nuclear power stations, in heating, refrigeration and air conditioning, and manufacturing.

Career specializations within this field include:

  • automotive engineer
  • aerospace engineer
  • energy systems engineer
  • healthcare systems engineer
  • manufacturing engineer

 

To be recommended for the degree of B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering, students must satisfactorily complete the courses in the specified categories as set out below. The categories cover an extended set of requirements, including the Mechanical Engineering core and Technical Electives requirements. The normal length of the program is 140 credits.

General Education Requirements
College of Engineering Requirements

Math/Science Requirement (8 credits)

To satisfy the College of Engineering requirements, Mechanical Engineering requires the following additional Math courses:

Course Code Course Name Credits
MATH 212 Calculus III 4 cr.
MATH 213 Probability and Statistical Inference 4 cr.

Core Requirements (55 credits)

Course Code Course Name Credits
MECH 180 Computer Aided Design 3 cr.
ENGR 200 Statics 3 cr.
MECH 201 Engineering Dynamics 3 cr.
MECH 225 Mechanics of Solids 4 cr.
MECH 240 Thermodynamics 3 cr.
MECH 270 Design for Manufacturabilty 3 cr.
MECH 325 Engineering Materials 4 cr.
MECH 335 Fluid Mechanics 4 cr.
MECH 350 Dynamic Systems and Vibration 4 cr.
MECH 356 Mechatronics 4 cr.
MECH 384 Control of Mechanical Systems 3 cr.
MECH 387 Machine Element Design 3 cr.
ENGR 399 Engineering Internship 1 cr.
MECH 443 Heat and Mass Transfer 4 cr.
MECH 486 Sustainable Energy 3 cr.
MECH 497 Senior Design Project I 3 cr.
MECH 498 Senior Design Project II 3 cr.

Technical Requirements (9 credits)

The following is a sample list of courses that will satisfy the technical electives in the Mechanical Engineering Program. The student must select a total of 9 credits from this list.  At most 3 credits of the technical electives may be at 300-level and at most 3 credits may be independent study. In addition, courses from the list below may be taken to satisfy the free electives requirement.

Course Code Course Name Credits
MECH 391 Independent Study I 1-3 cr.
AERO 426 Designing with Composites 3 cr.
ENGR 455 Finite Element Analysis 3 cr.
ENGR 465 Methods of Engineering Analysis 3 cr.
MECH 405 Vibration Analysis 3 cr.
MECH 420 Materials: Strength and Fracture 3 cr.
MECH 421 Mechanics of Deformable Solids 3 cr.
MECH 422 Fatigue and Fracture Analysis 3 cr.
MECH 435 Fluid Machinery 3 cr.
MECH 441 Applied Thermodynamics 3 cr.
MECH 445 Heating and Air Conditioning 3 cr.
MECH 446 Internal Combustion Engines 3 cr.
MECH 450 Vehicle Engineering 3 cr.
MECH 455 Robotics 3 cr.
MECH 465 Bioengineering 3 cr.
MECH 485 Power Plant Systems Design 3 cr.
MECH 491 Independent Study II 1-3 cr.
MECH 495 Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering 3 cr.

 

MECH 180 Computer Aided Design (2-3-3)
Prerequisite: None

The course introduces students to key concepts, techniques and applications of a Computer Aided Design (CAD) 3D Solid Modeling system. An introduction of visualization techniques in 2D and 3D, including hand sketching, is followed by an exploration of the parametric solid modeling environment, sketching and features.

MECH 201 Engineering Dynamics (3-0-3)
*(Cross listed with AERO 201; CIVE 201)
Prerequisite: ENGR 200

Review of kinematics and kinetics of particles: rectilinear and curvilinear motions; Newton's second law; energy and momentum methods. Kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies: plane motion of rigid bodies; forces and accelerations; energy and momentum methods.

MECH 225 Mechanics of Solids (3-3-4)
*(Cross listed with AERO 225)
Prerequisite: ENGR 200

The course is an introduction to the mechanics of deformable solids applied to basic engineering structures. It covers the concepts of stress and strain at a point; deformation of axial members; symmetric and asymmetric bending of elastic and elastic-perfectly plastic beams; torsion of open and closed section; beam deflection; stress and strain transformations, and elastic buckling of columns.

MECH 240 Thermodynamics (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: PHYS 121
Co-requisite: MATH 212
Introduction to the concept of energy and the laws governing the transfer and transformations of energy. Emphasis on thermodynamic properties of pure substance, the first law analysis of closed and open systems, the concept of entropy, and the second law of thermodynamics. Integration of these concepts into the analysis of basic power and refrigeration cycles.

MECH 270 Design for Manufacturability (3-3-4)
Co-requisite: MECH 180

Introduction to DFM methodologies and tools; designing for primary manufacturing processes (cutting fundamentals, casting, forming, and shaping); plastics production processes and designing with plastics (snap-fits, integral hinges, etc.); ceramics and powder metal production; design for assembly (DFA); rapid prototyping, and computer integrated manufacturing (CIM).

MECH 325 Engineering Materials (3-3-4)
Prerequisites: CHEM 115; PHYS 121

Materials (metals, alloys, polymers) in engineering practice; relationship of inter-atomic bonding, crystal structure and defect structure (vacancies, dislocations) to material properties; polymers, ceramics, composites, phase diagrams and alloys; microstructure control (heat treatment) and mechanical properties; material failure; corrosion.

MECH 335 Fluid Mechanics (3-3-4)
Prerequisite: PHYS 121, MATH 212

This course introduces students to concepts relating to fluids and examines the forces on them. Conservation of mass, momentum, and energy are fundamental to the physics. Various mathematical representations are considered, including differential and integral formulations. The complexity of fluid dynamics motivates the notions of simplifying assumptions, dimensional analysis, boundary layers, and shock waves, among others.

MECH 350 Dynamic Systems and Vibration (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: MATH 211; MECH 201, PHYS 122

Mathematical modeling of mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, electrical, and/or thermal systems; basic concepts in dynamic systems analysis – equilibrium, linearization; mechanical vibrations: free and forced vibration of single degree-of-freedom systems, transient and steady-state response, resonance, free vibration of two degree-of-freedom systems; transfer functions and block diagrams, design specifications based on step response, applications.

MECH 356 Mechatronics (3-3-4)
Prerequisite: MECH 350

Principles of mechatronic systems, modeling, time & frequency domain analysis. Feedback in mechatronic systems, prototype systems, PID controllers. Electronic components in mechatronic systems. Sensors, actuators, microcomputers, programming. Signal measurement, A/D and D/A conversion, quantization, digital filters and principles of Digital Signal Processing, digital controllers. Mechatronic system design and experiments.

MECH 384 Control of Mechanical Systems (2-3-3)
Co-requisite: MECH 350

Introduction to the control of mechanical and vibrating systems. State space and transfer function representations. Control specifications and control system architectures. PID and alternative controller design. Root locus and frequency domain designs. Application examples.

MECH 387 Machine Element Design (2-3-3)
Prerequisites: MECH 225; MECH 270

Design and analysis of machinery for load bearing and power transmission. Consideration of material failure modes. Design and selection of machine elements: shafts, rolling element bearings, bolts, belts, and power transmissions such as gears.

MECH 391 Independent Study I (Variable course credits from 1 to 3)
Prerequisite: Junior standing and approval of the department

This course gives an undergraduate student the opportunity to participate in an individual or group oriented project, study and/or research study under direction of a faculty member. A formal report is required.

MECH 405 Vibration Analysis (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MECH 350

Free and forced vibrations of one and two degree- of-freedom systems. Vibration measurement and isolation. Numerical methods for multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Modal analysis techniques. Dynamic vibration absorbers. Shaft whirling. Vibration of continuous systems: bars, plates, beams and shafts. Energy methods. Holzer method.

MECH 420 Materials: Strength and Fracture (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: AERO/MECH 220

The course is an introduction to the mechanics of fracture for engineering materials. It covers the analysis and prevention of failure in metals, polymers, ceramics and composites; plastic deformation and plastic collapse; initiation and propagation of cracks; environment-assisted cracking, and fatigue.

MECH 421 Mechanics of Deformable Solids (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: MECH 225

The course is an introduction to the theory of elasticity. It covers the concepts of deformation, stress and strain in a continuum; Formulation and solution strategy for boundary value problems in linear elasticity; Concepts of work and energy and the principle of virtual work; Problems in plane stress and plane strain in two-dimensional elasticity and solution using stress functions; Solutions to axial deformation, bending and torsion problems for elastic cylinders.

MECH 422 Fatigue and Fracture Analysis (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: MECH 225

The course is an introduction to elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics and fatigue. It covers the topics of stress concentration due to defects, linear elastic fracture mechanics, energy methods in fracture mechanics, stress analysis of cracks and stress intensity, stress-life and strain-life methods of fatigue analysis and design, and initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks under cyclic loading.

MECH 435 Fluid Machinery (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MECH 335

The basic operating principles of fluid machinery and fluid power installations. Topics covered include: pipelines, centrifugal pumps and fans, hydraulic turbines, high pressure hydraulic systems and positive displacement pumps. Problem analysis emphasizes mechanical engineering applications.

MECH 441 Applied Thermodynamics (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MECH 240

Gas and vapour power cycles: reheat, regeneration, combined gas/vapour cycles, cogeneration. Heat pump and refrigeration cycles: vapour compression cycles, absorption refrigeration and gas refrigeration. Mixtures of perfect gases and vapours: stoichiometry and combustion.

MECH 443 Heat and Mass Transfer (3-3-4)
Co-requisite: MECH 335

Mechanisms of heat and transfer: fundamental physical mechanisms and applications. Steady and transient conduction: Convective heat and mass transfer and the Reynolds analogy: free and forced convection for laminar and turbulent flows; heat exchangers. Radiative heat transfer between black and grey surfaces. Fundamentals of mass diffusion.

MECH 445 Heating and Air Conditioning (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MECH 240

Environmental demands for residential, commercial and industrial systems. Methods of altering and controlling environment. Air distribution. Refrigeration methods, equipment and controls. Integrated year-round air-conditioning and heating systems; heat pumps. Cooling load and air-conditioning calculations. Thermal radiation control. Component matching. System analysis and design.

MECH 446 Internal Combustion Engines (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MECH 240

The basic operating principles of internal combustion engines. Topics covered include: engine thermodynamics, thermochemistry and fuels, engine fluid mechanics and heat transfer and pollutant emissions. Problem analysis emphasizes propulsion and power-generation applications in mechanical engineering.

MECH 450 Vehicle Engineering (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: MECH 386; MECH 350

The course emphasizes the engineering and design principles of road transport vehicles. Topics to be covered include: performance characteristics, handling behaviour and ride quality of road vehicles.

MECH 455 Robotics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: MECH 356

This course is an introduction to kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators. Emphasis is placed on computer use in control of actual robots and in simulation of mathematical models of robots.

MECH 465 Bioengineering (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MECH 225
Co-requisite: MECH 325

This is an introductory course to bioengineering. Basic mechanical description of the hierarchical structure of an organism: molecules, membranes, cells, tissues, skeleton, and locomotion, will be covered. Conservation of material, energy, charge and momentum in biological systems will also be covered.

MECH 485 Power Plant Systems Design (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MECH 443

This course covers a detailed engineering analysis and design of a thermal power plant, including heat balance, selection of equipment (boiler, turbines, heat exchangers, pumps, cooling tower), performance evaluation, economic evaluation and feasibility studies.

MECH 486 Sustainable Energy (2-3-3)
Prerequisite: MECH 240

The course provides introductory coverage of energy production, conversion, distribution and storage systems for different sources of energy including fossil fuel; nuclear power; biomass energy; geothermal energy; hydropower; wind energy, and solar energy. Emphasis is placed on the sustainable use of energy in light of economic, environmental, and societal constraints.

MECH 491 Independent Study II (Variable course credits from 1 to 3)
Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department

This course gives an undergraduate student the opportunity to participate in an individual or group oriented project, study and/or research study under direction of a faculty member. A formal report is required.

MECH 497 Senior Design Project I (1-6-3)
Prerequisites: MECH 325; MECH 384; MECH 387

Participation in team projects dealing with design and development of a product or a system. Number of project will be offered each year by the different departments, some of which will have a multi-disciplinary nature. This will be an opportunity to exercise initiative, engineering judgment, self-reliance and creativity, in a team environment similar to industry. The design projects require students to draw upon their engineering background, experience, and other pertinent resources. Oral and written presentations are required.

MECH 498 Senior Design Project II (0-9-3)
Prerequisite: MECH 497

Continuation of 497

The following is a typical study sequence for a student enrolled in the B.Sc. degree in Mechanical Engineering program:

Year 1 ENGL 111 English Communication I 4 cr. ENGL 112 English Communication II 4 cr.
MATH 111 Calculus I 4 cr. MATH 112 Calculus II 4 cr.
CHEM 115 Introduction to General Chemistry for Engineers 4 cr. PHYS 121 University Physics I 4 cr.
ENGR 111 Engineering Design 4 cr. ENGR 112 Introduction to Computing 4 cr.
Summer HUMAxxx Humanities and Social Sciences 3cr.    
Year 2 MECH 180- Computer Aided Design 3 cr. HUMA xxx Humanities and Social Sciences 3 cr.
MATH 211 Differential Equations and Linear Algebra 4 cr. MATH 212 Calculus III 4 cr.
PHYS 122 University Physics II 4 cr. MECH 240 Thermodynamics 3 cr.
ENGR 200 Statics 3 cr. MECH 201 Engineering Dynamics 3 cr.
MECH 270 Design for Manufacturability 3 cr. MECH 225 Mechanics of Solids 4 cr.
Summer HUMA xxx Humanities and Social Sciences 3cr.    
Year 3 ENGR 311 Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Engineering Design 4 cr. BUSS 201 Fundamentals of Accounting and Finance 3 cr.
MECH 325 Engineering Materials 4 cr. Free Elective 3 cr.
MATH 223 Probability and Statistical Inference 4 cr. MECH 335 Fluid Mechanics 4 cr.
MECH 350 Dynamic Systems and Vibration 4 cr. MECH 356 Mechatronics 4 cr.
MECH 384 Control of Mechanical Systems 3 cr. MECH 387 Machine Element Design 3 cr.
Summer ENGR 399 Internship 1cr.     
Year 4 BUSS 301 Inside Organizations 3 cr. Technical Elective 3 cr.
Technical Elective 3 cr. Free Elective 3 cr.
MECH 497 Senior Design Project I 3 cr. Technical Elective 3 cr.
HUMA xxx Humanities and Social Sciences 3 cr. MECH 497 Senior Design Project II 3 cr.
MECH 443 Heat and Mass Transfer 4 cr. MECH 498 Sustainable Energy 3 cr.

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