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Structural Engineering and Mechanics

Structural Engineering and Mechanics

Structural Engineering and Mechanics is the field of Civil Engineering particularly concerned with the analysis and design of a variety of structures such as buildings, bridges, dams, tunnels, highways, and airports. 

Research projects focus on the application of Engineering Mechanics to the design of structures and facilities related to the urban infrastructure and construction in UAE. Research and study cover advanced structural analysis, design of steel and concrete structures, material testing and development of innovative materials in structures and construction, structural health monitoring, and high performance computational modeling and simulations in fluid and solid mechanics.

Faculty

Turbulence modeling based on regularizations of the Navier-Stokes equations

Numerical methods for large-scale wind driven ocean circulation

Grain-size dependent mechanical properties of nanocrystalline materials


Turbulence Modeling Based on Regularizations of the Navier-Stokes Equations

Turbulence is the promising multiscale problem, with a wide range of eddy scales, in which large-scale quantities depend on the small-scale flow motions. Understanding multiscale interactions for high Reynolds-number turbulence has been a major challenge with direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equation due to the computational cost. As a result, regularizations of the Navier-Stokes equation have been studied as subgrid models that attempt to capture the influence of the small-scale flow motions of physical phenomena at larger scales. The objective of this research is to advance or develop theoretically existing regularizations for accurate and efficient simulations of high Reynolds turbulent flows and to validate these models numerically for practical applications.

Turbulence Modeling

Personnel

PI: Dr. Tae Yeon Kim


Numerical Methods for Large-Scale Wind Driven Ocean Circulation

The large-scale ocean flows play a significant role in determining of many of the Earth’s regions. One of the major sources of the ocean flows is the wind. Wind drives the subtropical and subpolar gyres, which correspond to the strong, persistent, subtropical and subpolar western boundary currents in the north Atlantic ocean and the north Pacific ocean, as well as their subtropical counterparts in the southern hemisphere. One of the standard mathematical models for large-scale oceanic flows is the quasi-geostrophic equations. The purpose of this research is to develop efficient and accurate numerical methods for the study of large-scale wind driven ocean circulation using the quasi-geostrophic equations. Figure shows the streamlines with the western boundary layer obtained from a recently developed B-spline-based finite-element method based on the streamfunction formulation of the quasi-geostrophic equations.

Numerical Methods for Large Scale Wind driven ocean circulation

Personnel

PI: Dr. Tae Yeon Kim


Grain-size Dependent Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystalline Materials

A bulk nanocrystalline material is a polycrystal with a grain size of characteristic linear dimension less than 100 nm. Applications of these materials are rapidly growing, for example, nanocrystalline coatings and thin films. The novel properties of nanocrystalline materials are generally attributed to the high density of grain boundaries and junctions. The major challenge in studying nanocrystalline materials is that classical continuum theory, which has no material length scale, fails to model nanoscale grain size effects. As a result, numerical studies based on classical continuum theory are incapable of predicting the mechanical response of nanocrystalline materials. The objective of this research is to investigate mechanical properties of nanocrystalline materials based on a second-gradient theory through the development and application of a relatively inexpensive finite-element method. Figures show the prediction of the grain-size dependent Young’s modulus and stress distribution of bulk nanocrystalline copper.

Personnel

PI: Dr. Tae Yeon Kim